This week in Techno-Liberty (March 21)

Learning digital security: A new project, the Digital Security Exchange, is dedicated to “helping the U.S. digital security community be more responsive to the needs of civil society groups and high-risk communities.” The introductory article, by Josh Levy, states that “digital security is largely a human problem, not a technical one.” It’s hard for people without much technical knowledge to understand. It will talk with high-risk groups and match trainers up with communities.
Continue reading This week in Techno-Liberty (March 21)

Should the Internet of Things Be Regulated?

There’s a big problem with little devices on the Internet. A lot of them have really sloppy security. They have default passwords which require extra effort to change. Some have their own Web servers for no fathomable reason, and others have unsecured Wi-Fi connections. People install them with very little thought and no configuration.

These devices are vulnerable to attacks that take them over remotely, incorporating them into botnets. The October 21 attack on Dyn’s DNS servers made many websites unreachable for a large part of the day. The attack came from thermostats, refrigerators, security cameras, and light bulbs. It’s like an episode of The Twilight Zone.
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What does Jefferson Sessions mean for tech liberties?

Yesterday the U.S. Senate voted to confirm Jefferson Sessions as Attorney General. This was a key appointment in Trump’s campaign to consolidate his power, and bad for liberties of all kind, including data privacy.

In general, he’s a vile person. Sessions “has been the fiercest, most dedicated, and most loyal promoter in Congress of Trump’s agenda.” Stephen Bannon says so. He isn’t going to stand in the way, as his Sally Yates did, when Trump issues illegal and unconstitutional orders.
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